Birthday Newcastle Cardigan

I’ve had my eye on the Thread Theory Newcastle Cardigan for Brian ever since I first started sewing (2 years ago!).  It always seemed a bit too complicated so I never attempted it until now.  Well, I sewed it for Brian’s birthday in September, but we weren’t able to get any pictures until now.  First it was 80 degrees in September, then he worked night shifts in the ER in October.  Now it’s finally cool enough to wear it, and I’m glad we got some more autumnal pictures anyway.

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I was in a bit of a quandary because, true to fashion, I decided to make this with about 2 days to spare.  So I had to find fabric locally instead of online, meaning my selection was limited.  I ended up finding this lightweight sweater knit at my local store, Vogue Fabrics.  I wasn’t 100% crazy over it when I bought it, but as I sewed it up I really liked the finished look.  This is the large cowl, which is wonderfully cozy.

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This pattern is no joke.  Between the back yoke, shoulder yokes, clean insides and placket facing, the finish is top notch.  I’d expect nothing less from a Thread Theory pattern, but truly no details were spared, despite being an “easy” knit pattern.  I really appreciate patterns like this, because they typically yield high end pieces that teach me a lot in the process.  Of course, I don’t want everything I sew to be this complicated, but I really enjoy it when I can mix things up a bit.

My machine truly HATES sewing button holes through layers of knit fabric.  But I finally got it in the end, though maybe not as pretty as it could have been.  I used some wood-look buttons, which I thought added a nice rustic flare.

Brian ended up loving this one too.  The lighter weight knit is good because he doesn’t like things too hot.  I think he likes the look because it has a bit more of a refined feel to it, which he’s been drawn to lately.  Of course, he offset it with this graphic tee I made him – I like the contrast actually!  The tee is a triblend Strathcona Henley with vinyl I cut with my Silhouette Cameo.  Design is from Thread and Grain.

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As far as modifications go, I made his measured size, which was an XL.  He’s measured into L on the dot previously with Thread Theory patterns, but for some reason this one seems to be sized differently.  He was actually in between sizes so I sized up since I knew he’d be wearing things underneath it.  The fit in the body is great.  I added an extra inch to the sleeves because I normally do this for him with Thread Theory patterns, and most others.  It seems that wasn’t needed with the XL, because the sleeves ended up being an inch too long.  The sweater knit is also 4 way stretch, so I think that also had something to do with it.  After these photos I took the cuffs off and removed the inch, and slimmed the bottom of the sleeves.  I’m guessing this was needed because of being between the sizes.  I was worried about the fit in the chest since there really isn’t much give there generally speaking, but it ended up being perfect.

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I’m hoping to make another one of these, when I find the perfect fabric.  Brian would like accent shoulder yokes too, which would look cool.  I’d highly encourage you to try out this one, or really any of the Thread Theory patterns.  It’s hard to come by a line of excellent mens’ patterns, and these are always a hit.  I think the modern silhouette really helps, not to mention the finished product has always turned out great for me. 🙂

Elisabeth

Patterns: Thread Theory Newcastle Cardigan, Thread Theory Strathcona Henley | Vogue Fabrics, Knitpop

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